Social comparisons and need fulfillment

Author(s)
John Velez, David Ewoldsen, Michael Hanus, Hyunjin Song, Jonathan Villarreal
Abstract

This study examines how social comparison information provided by video game leaderboards may influence players’ retrospective judgments of autonomy, competence, and relatedness need fulfillment. Participants played a video game and were randomly assigned to receive no postgame feedback or were shown a leaderboard that placed them in the top or bottom quartile of players. Results indicate downward social comparisons increase enjoyment by increasing competence and relatedness perceptions. However, upward comparisons did not have an opposite effect, nor did either type of social comparison influence players’ autonomy perceptions. Implications for applying Self-Determination Theory to video game enjoyment in the context of social comparison feedback is discussed.

Organisation(s)
Department of Communication
External organisation(s)
Indiana University Bloomington, Michigan State University, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Texas Tech University
Journal
Communication Research Reports
Volume
35
Pages
424-433
ISSN
0882-4096
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1080/08824096.2018.1525352
Publication date
2018
Peer reviewed
Yes
Austrian Fields of Science 2012
508006 Communication theory
Portal url
https://ucris.univie.ac.at/portal/en/publications/social-comparisons-and-need-fulfillment(8166fce6-2d34-4792-b6e0-cdec044df067).html